Wednesday

Visitor Q

Audition was the first movie that I ever saw of Takashi Miike. More than its disturbing contents I was impressed by the camera-angles and the character development. I, definitely, wanted to see his other works and I came to know about Visitor Q. I started looking for the movie but it was very rare to find. But finally few days ago I got hold of one copy.
Various film-critic forums sites Visitor Q as one of the most disturbing movie ever made ( Audition was also in the list). But I don’t agree with it… Or do I?
Visitor Q or Bijitâ Q is not as refined as Audition or Ă”dishon but it is worth watching. Influenced by Pier Paolo Pasolini's Teorema, The movie comes as a dark comedy mixed with trademark Takashi Miike’s extreme cinema filled with violence, blood and all the *beep* one can imagine. But behind all this gore there is a hidden current, a whole surreal experience which can’t be said but experienced only. It’s the story about a dysfunctional Japanese family. Kiyoshi is an out-of-work TV reporter who hopes to get his job back by using his children as the subject of his filmpiece. At first he tries to make a documentary on his daughter Miki (Fujiko), who has run away from home and is in the process of becoming a prostitute, then Takuya (Jun Muto), his son who is constantly bullied by his schoolmates. Takuya being bullied takes out his anger on his mother Keiko (Shungiko Uchida) by beating her with a collection of canes. To relieve the pain Keiko takes heroin, and sells her body to buy another dose. Then a stranger (Kazushi Watanabe) comes to stay with them. He knocks some sense in the family and when I say knock I mean literally.
The core of the film is an analysis on reality TV and the disintegration of Japanese family life. The film do succeeds in most of the parts especially when Kiyoshi starts his project on bullies. Complete credit should go to Miike’s direction who holds the film together from going into pure surrealistic insanity.

A must watch for the extreme-cinema fans!!!

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